Sunday, 2 September 2012

Heroine Necklace

So all summer I have been working on Jean Power's amazing Heroine Necklace.  The pattern came out in the August/September issue of Beadwork Magazine and as soon as I saw it I fell utterly in love with it and knew I needed to make one for myself!

Here is my attempt:

 The triangle chain was so easy to do - repetitive but easy!  The clasp is a rather remarkable design that is fully reversible so that you can have two totally different looks in one necklace.  On this side I found a gorgeous vintage German pressed glass cabochon that had triangular facets which I just loved as it echoed the triangle link chain.


Here's a close up of the chain:


On the other side of the clasp, I decided to use a titanium coated agate druzy.  I wanted something that looked really industrial but organic and thus completely at odds but in harmony with the rigidity of the steel triangles.  I think it works! 

Side view:


The colour of the druzy really lightens the steel in comparison with the black glass cab.

In all, this has been a mammoth project, and definitely not a hill I'll be scaling anytime soon again!  All the effort, and 100g of steel delicas is definitely worth it though as I think it looks amazing.  Jean made such a clever clasp and the fact that you can wear it without the clasp and tie it together with ribbon just adds to the versatility.  I love this necklace and thanks to Jean for such an amazing pattern!

20 comments:

  1. Very elegant. Nice job.
    Nicole/Beadwright

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    1. Thank you so much, I enjoyed making it a lot

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  2. Great beadwork!!!!!!!!! I love it!!!!!!!!!

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    1. Thanks!¬!! I kinda love it too, and because it took so long to make, I think I'll even wear it when I'm cleaning!

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  3. This is amazing, you did such a wonderful job !

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    1. All credit really ought to go to the amazing Jean Power for she was the one who thought up such an exquisite design! All I did was sew some beads together

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  4. Spectacular, great, wonderful ... !!!

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  5. Wow, this is beyond stunning. You rightfully give lots of credit to Jean Power, but it takes a lot of skill to re-create a demanding piece like that. I love both of your focals.

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    1. Thank you so much.
      I love them too, they were such perfect finds and really change the look of the necklace according to which side is showing.

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  6. I can't stop looking! Jean's willingness to share her creativity is a gift to all of us - and you have done an amazing work with her design. You have made it your own with your beautiful choice of focals.

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    1. It so is, isn't it! And even though I made it I'm still really impressed, where I usually lose interest as soon as I've finished a piece! She is marvellous :)

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  7. It looks truly wonderful!
    I know just what a mammoth project it is and I admire you for completing it- and so soon!
    I think I only stuck with mine as I had to :)

    Thank you for much for showing us all

    Jean

    x

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    1. Thanks so much :D
      I had to do it all in one hit or I know I would have never finished it! I'm glad I did though - I was stopped in the street three times yesterday by strangers asking me where I got it from and they were all utterly gobsmacked when I said I'd made it! Most of the people at work thought it was triangles of solid metal and were really impressed when I said that it was teeny tiny beads sewn together! :)
      Thank you so much for giving us such a great pattern.
      x

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  8. Wow!! Just incredible. I keep gazing at this project wanting so much to do it. I want to use eyeball cabs, but so far have not been successful in finding the right size. I love the Drusy Cab you've used :-)

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    1. I thought about an eyeball on one side but then I found the druzy and just couldn't resist! The right size eyeballs are a nightmare to source - I think you'll probably have to get a doll maker's eyeball and get it sliced in half to get the right size. or you could bead embroider an antique real one to get it the right shape and size??
      :)

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